Austin360 On The Record: Bright Light Social Hour, Jerry David DeCicca, more

Jerry David DeCicca with keyboardist Eve Searls and guitarist Don Cento at Beerland in February 2018. DeCicca celebrates the release of his new disc “Burning Daylight” at Beerland on Saturday, September 29. Peter Blackstock/American-Statesman

OUT THIS WEEK

Jerry David DeCicca, “Burning Daylight” (Super Secret). The second full-length release this year from DeCicca, a Hill Country transplant from Ohio, is more in the vein of rootsy Americana than February’s comparatively minimalist “Time the Teacher.” Recorded at renowned West Texas studio Sonic Ranch with co-producer Joe Trevino, the record benefits from the tasteful and vibrant guitar work of Don Cento and Tyler Evans, plus tight rhythms from drummer Gary Mallaber and bassist Canaan Faulkner. Perhaps most significant among his backing crew is keyboardist Eve Searls, who contributes backing vocals and steps out for a sublime duet on the title track. It’s the most immediately infectious tune on the record and also the most Central-Texas-centric, with references to the Hill Country towns of Johnson City and Blanco and Highway 281. Release show Sept. 29 at Beerland. Here’s the track “Cutting Down the Country”:

Autumn Fakes, “A Sequence of Cheers for Cause and Effect.” Guitarist Jennings Crawford has a long history on the Austin indie scene, most notably as frontman for punk-pop band the Wannabes, but it’s his wife, Mikki Gibson, who’s out front here. Gibson favors concise songwriting; only the dreamy “Echo” exceeds four minutes, and nine of the 12 tracks are under three minutes. The musical structures almost always reach beyond simple chord patterns, and if that means they don’t often sink in immediately, they reward repeated listens. Release show Sept. 29 at Knomad Bar. Here’s the opening track, “Beam”:

Bright Light Social Hour, “Missing Something” EP (Modern Outsider). Part of what the accomplished psych-rock quartet was missing as they made this record was bassist-vocalist Jackie O’Brien’s brother Alex, the group’s longtime manager, who took his own life in 2015. The pathos is ingrained in the short but deeply affecting title track, which swirls with a darkness that makes the loss plain. The other four tunes are generally more upbeat, with grooves that sometimes veer toward dance-floor material. Playing Sept. 30 at Cheer Up Charlie’s. Here’s the video for the track “Trip With Lola”:

Nobody’s Girl, “Waterline” EP (Lucky Hound). The debut from the trio of singer-songwriters Betty Soo, Grace Pettis and Rebecca Loebe supplements original tunes with fellow Austin singer-songwriter Raina Rose’s “Bluebonnets” and a cover of Blondie’s “Call Me.” Recording with renowned producer/keyboardist Michael Ramos, they worked with a major-league backing crew: guitarist David Grissom, bassist Glenn Fukunaga, drummer J.J. Johnson and pedal steel player Ricky Ray Jackson. “Waterline” probably fits under the broad Americana umbrella, but this feels like pop music at its core, with electric instrumentation prominent in the arrangements. Release show Sept. 29 at Saxon Pub. Here’s the video for the title track:

Charlie Belle, “Like I Love This” EP. Latest release from the brother-sister duo of Jendayi and Gyasi Bonds, profiled by American-Statesman writer Deborah Sengupta Stith in 2015. Playing Oct. 13 at Whip In. Here’s the video for the EP track “Essay”:

COMING SOON

  • OCT. 5: Molly Burch, “First Flower” (Captured Tracks), in-store Oct. 4 at Waterloo Records, playing Oct. 6 at Austin City Limits Music Festival, release show Oct. 20 at Barracuda.
  • OCT. 5: Max Frost, “Gold Rush” (Atlantic), playing Nov. 10 at Scoot Inn.
  • OCT. 5: Michael Martin Murphey, “Austinology: Alleys of Austin,” playing Dec. 21 at Paramount Theatre.
  • OCT. 12: Lindsay Beaver, “Tough As Love” (Alligator), playing Oct. 2 at Antone’s.
  • OCT. 12: Edie Brickell & New Bohemians, “Rocket” (Verve Forecast).
  • OCT. 15: Kevin Welch, “Dust Devil” (Dead Reckoning), playing Nov. 15 at Susanna’s Kitchen in Wimberley.
  • OCT. 19: Kendall Beard, “Here Comes Trouble,” playing Nov. 10 at Lamberts.
  • OCT. 25: Lesly Reynaga, release show Oct. 25 at One-2-One Bar.
  • OCT. 26: Carson McHone, “Carousel,” playing Nov. 1 at Cactus Cafe.
  • OCT. 26: Jamie Lin Wilson, “Jumping Over Rocks,” playing Oct. 20 at Sam’s Town Point.
  • OCT. 26: Isaac Jacob Band, self-titled (Union 28).
  • NOV. 7: Kate Howard, release show Nov. 7 at One-2-One Bar.
  • NOV. 9: Sydney Wright, “Seiche.”

French band Phoenix added to ACL Fest first-weekend lineup

French band Phoenix at La Zona Rosa in 2009. The band has been added to this year’s first weekend of ACL Fest on Sunday, Oct. 7. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

French synth-pop band Phoenix has been added to the Sunday lineup for the first weekend of the Austin City Limits Music Festival, the fest announced Thursday afternoon via social media.

The addition comes in the wake of headliner Childish Gambino’s cancellation of his Sunday shows on both weekends of the festival, in the wake of an injury suffered at a show in Dallas earlier this week.

RELATED: Childish Gambino cancels ACL Fest appearance

Phoenix already was booked for two sold-out shows next week at Stubb’s on Oct. 3-4. They’ll return for the Oct. 7 fest appearance after Oct. 5-6 dates in Dallas and Memphis.

The band last played ACL Fest in 2013. They also did a surprise show at Anderson High School that year. They haven’t played in Austin since those shows.  The band released a new album, “Ti Amo,” last year.

READ MORE: Review of Phoenix at ACL Fest 2013

Trombone Shorty brings the fire, and a Neville, to ‘Austin City Limits’ taping

Trombone Shorty (left) and his Orleans Avenue bandmates perform for “Austin City Limits” at ACL Live on Wednesday, September 26, 2018. Scott Newton/KLRU-TV/Austin City Limits

It’s not like Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews and his 10-piece Orleans Avenue backing crew needed any help in their second “Austin City Limits” taping. The New Orleans funk shooting stars had lit up ACL Live for more than an hour with blasts of horns, guitars, vocals and percussion when they brought out a special guest on two songs. But Cyril Neville definitely took them to another level.

Building the bridge between this modern-day juggernaut and the historical legacy of the Neville Brothers was a natural move, but it underscores how smart Andrews is, and how aware he is of the roots of his music. Cyril will turn 70 in a few weeks, but that was hard to imagine watching him perform “No More Okedoke” and “Fiyo on the Bayou” with Andrews and his crew, singing loud and moving proud like he hadn’t yet turned 30.

Troy Andrews, aka Trombone Shorty, performs at an “Austin City Limits” taping at ACL Live on Wednesday, September 26, 2018. Scott Newton/KLRU-TV/Austin City Limits

The surprise cameo put a cap on a blockbuster night. Among the tapings I’ve attended over the past five years, very few have bottled up this much raw energy. Foo Fighters, probably. The Tedeschi Trucks band, likely. Add Shorty to that short list.

A lot of the credit goes to his bandmates. Saxophonists Dane Oestreicher and BK Jackson share the front line with Andrews, blasting out brass bursts and often dancing in step with bassist Mike Bass-Bailey. Add guitarists Joshua Connelly and Pete Murano, drummers Alvin Ford Jr. and Joey Peebles, percussionist Weedie Braimah, and backing vocalists Tracci Lee and Chrishira Perrier, and the stage was constantly alive with a maelstrom of activity.

The 12-song set drew from a range of the Trombone Shorty catalog, including “Where It At?” and “Here Come the Girls” from last year’s “Parking Lot Symphony,” “Long Weekend” from 2013’s “Say That to Say This,” the instrumental show-opener “Buckjump” from 2011’s “For True,” and “Something Beautiful” from 2010’s “Backatown.” As a whole, though, the show felt more like it coalesced into one giant suite of glorious noise.

During the encore tune “Do to Me,” Andrews finally took that energy right into the crowd, which had responded to his band’s spirit with their own boisterous support all night. Weaving his way into the middle of a pogo-ing throng on the floor, he briefly brought everything down — both musically and physically, coaching the crowd members to crouch along with him as the band laid back for about a minute. Then, right on cue with his “one-two-three-four” countoff, the band and the crowd exploded, leaping into action again for a glorious finale that, fittingly, included an excerpt of “The Saints Go Marching In.” By end of the night, everyone wanted to be in that number, indeed.

Charlie Robison announces retirement after surgery complications

Charlie Robison in a 2009 Dualtone Records promotional photo.

Texas country-rock singer-songwriter Charlie Robison announced to fans on his official Facebook page Thursday night that he’s “officially retiring from the stage and studio” after complications from a surgery procedure earlier this year left him permanently unable to sing.

Brothers Charlie and Bruce Robison rose from the Hill Country town of Bandera in the early 1990s to become two of Central Texas’ most successful Americana artists. Charlie, 54, released nine albums between 1996 and 2013. He was married to Emily Strayer (nee Erwin) of the Dixie Chicks from 1999 to 2008; they have three children.

In 2009, former American-Statesman staffer Michael Corcoran wrote the following profile of Charlie:

Charlie Robison hates doing interviews and they sometimes hate him right back, like the time in the ’90s he got wasted and ending up trashing just about every country music act besides his beloved George Strait – which is what you want to do when you’re an outsider from Texas on a Nashville label.That late-night jawing session set to print probably didn’t hurt Robison’s musical career as much as when he wed the sexiest member of country music’s biggest act in 1999. You can’t be a country music “outlaw” when you’re holding your wife’s purse on the red carpet while she’s being interviewed by a guy from ‘N Sync. Robison had become Stedman in a Stetson, a professional “plus one.”

But even as Mr. Dixie Chick, Robison maintained a pretty good career, with four albums each selling in the 100,000-300,000 range. He was a judge on the first season of “Nashville Star” and has had a couple songs in movies and TV shows. But when your wife’s won 18 Grammys and you’re still playing Gruene Hall, it’s hard to not become the Kris Kristofferson character in “A Star Is Born.”

Then, when the Dixie Chicks luxury liner hit an iceberg after anti-Bush comments Natalie Maines made in 2003, Robison became first mate on the Titanic of twang. What happened to the guy who just wanted to write a song as good as Willie Nelson’s “The Party’s Over”?

The old Robison was back in peak rascal form on a recent Thursday at the historic Liberty Bar in downtown San Antonio. The 6-foot-4-inch, 245-pound Troy Aikman look-alike drove up in a gold Yukon with black rims, wearing a straw cowboy hat and big, gaudy $4 sunglasses. Robison ordered a Jack Daniels with a beer back before his rear hit the seat. “Welcome to media day!” he toasted. The shots of Jack Daniels stacked up like planes over DFW as Robison talked about a new album that can’t get here soon enough.

Robison started writing the ironically titled “Beautiful Day” the day after he filed for divorce from Emily Robison in January 2008 on grounds of “discord or conflict of personalities.” The couple has three children.

“When our parents got divorced, they didn’t tell me and Bruce (his songwriter brother) why it happened,” says Charlie Robison, who was 8 at the time. “But we had ‘Phases and Stages’ (the Willie Nelson divorce album where the husband told his side, then the wife told hers) to help make some sense of it. My record is like side one of ‘Phases and Stages.’ “

The woman’s point of view in this split could be told by the cover of Bruce Springsteen’s “Racing in the Streets,” which ends the album. It’s a song about pursuing a calling at all costs, even if it means someone is always waiting at home. (Emily Robison currently is not doing interviews and could not be reached for comment.)

“I knew that when I was marrying Emily, I was also, in a sense, marrying (Dixie Chicks) Martie (Maguire) and Natalie (Maines),” Robison says. “Those three girls were already tighter than any three people I’ve ever met. But when the Bush thing happened, they really stuck together.”

As the trio fought hard to hold on to what they had built up, Charlie Robison said he felt left out. He also lost sponsors, he said, because of his affiliation with the Chicks.

“It was intense and it was every day,” Robison says of the media glare. The couple had seen a marriage counselor who noted that in the Dixie Chicks’ documentary “Shut Up and Sing,” Charlie Robison was off to the side while Maines and Maguire were bedside when Emily Robison was about to give birth to twins in 2005. “He was wondering what that meant and I said, ‘They were filming a documentary!’ They were making a movie that I didn’t feel a part of.”

Although they didn’t officially divorce until Aug. 6, 2008, Charlie Robison says he saw it coming in March 2005 when Emily moved to Los Angeles to write songs with her bandmates and make an album with Rick Rubin. Charlie stayed in Texas to run the ranch the couple owns near Kerrville.

“It’s funny,” he says. “I can’t stand L.A., but some of my most successful songs, like ‘Sunset Boulevard’ and ‘El Cerrito Place’ are set there.”

The new album opens with another good song that takes place in his least favorite city. Over a hard strum, Robison sings, “Well she’s hangin’ out in Venice with her Siamese cat/ She’s tellin’ everybody she’s a Democrat/ She sold her Palomino when the tire went flat/ On the 405.” Earlier in the interview, Robison says he wasn’t going to talk about specifics of the new songs, except to say they have thinly veiled references to his ex. But when asked what “her Palomino” was about, Robison pointed his thumb toward his chest.

“I gave Emily a CD a few days ago and she said she really liked it,” says Charlie, whose two-story house with the circular drive in the upscale, yet funky Olmos Park neighborhood is just a 10-minute drive to his ex-wife’s house. “There are probably a few things on there she’s not wild about, but she’s always been very supportive of my music.”

With the wound still fresh, Robison delves deep into what went wrong on songs such as the title track, “Yellow Blues” and a cover of “Nothin’ Better To Do” by Bobby Bare Jr.

Robison says what made “Beautiful Day” especially therapeutic was that he was surrounded by old friends. Warren Hood, who toured with Robison one summer while still a student at Austin High, plays fiddle on the record. Rich Brotherton and Charlie Sexton, whom Robison has known since moving to Austin in the late ’80s, lend rich guitar textures, while another old runnin’ buddy, Bukka Allen, handles keyboards. “Making this record felt like a homecoming,” says Robison, who produced “Beautiful Day” at his brother’s Premium Sound Studios.

There’s a sense of bitterness to the album, but there’s an air of starting over in better shape than going in. “There ain’t no blues where I point my shoes/ Well buddy have you heard the news/ I’m fine, I’m fine” he sings on “She’s So Fine.”

“Emily is the mother of my children and I love her, but over time we just discovered that we didn’t have as much in common as we thought we did,” Robison says, showing that this celebrity divorce is no different than most others.

Robison says the divorce was so amicable that the couple used the same attorney to draw up the papers. “We had always set it up as us having separate accounts,” he says. “She got her money and I got mine.” The couple owns the ranch jointly, he says, with the intent of passing it on to the children. (Robison has the names of his three children tattooed on one arm and the logo of the U.S. Army division he entertained in Iraq in 2007 on his other arm.)

Although Robison is reluctant to leave San Antonio, “the only city I’ll ever live in,” the new record means a new tour. And a reintroduction to a public that has mainly known him this past decade as a husband.

“About a year ago, someone introduced me as a ‘Texas songwriting legend’ and it kinda took me wrong,” says Robison. “I wanted to say, ‘No! I’m the bad boy of country music!” Then he bugs out his eyes and roars. “Look, I’m still crazy!”

The legend part especially confused him. “First, it’s not even close to being true,” he says. “And second, ‘legend’ means you’re done and I feel, at the age of 44, that I’ve finally figured out how to make a record.”

Tis not the season, yet, but here’s the Armadillo Christmas Bazaar lineup

Austin rising star Mélat will play the Armadillo Christmas Bazaar on Dec. 21 at noon. Tom McCarthy Jr. for AMERICAN-STATESMAN 2016

It’s beginning to look a lot like… well, the autumn equinox? The arrival of fall brings an early announcement of the music lineup for the Armadillo Christmas Bazaar, which will present its 43rd annual holiday shopping extravaganza from Dec. 13-24 at Palmer Events Center.

PHOTOS: Gallery from last year’s Armadillo Christmas Bazaar

Lots of familiar locals fill out the 12-days-of-pre-Christmas schedule, but there’s also a rare and intriguing out-of-town addition. Cajun/zydeco accordionist C.J. Chenier and his Red Hot Louisiana Band, regular visitors to Antone’s in recent years, will play the 7 p.m. slot on Dec. 23. Two other non-locals also will appear: Oklahoma’s John Fullbright (3 p.m. Dec. 15) and Mississippi’s Charlie Mars (3 p.m. Sept. 21).

Highlights among hometown acts include Shinyribs (7 p.m. Dec. 14), Ray Wylie Hubbard (7 p.m. Dec. 18), Tomar & the FCs (noon Dec. 16), Suzanna Choffel (noon Dec. 19) and Mobley (3 p.m. Dec. 20). The final Saturday, Dec. 23, features a triple-threat of Austin blues women with Shelley King (noon), Carolyn Wonderland (3 p.m.) and Marcia Ball (7 p.m.).

RELATED: Scenes from the 2016 Armadillo Christmas Bazaar

Tickets are now on sale via the Bazaar’s website. Single-day tickets cost $10; full-run passes good for all dates are $50 and will be sold online through Dec. 12.

Here’s the full lineup:

Video premiere: Nobody’s Girl seeks their own level on ‘Waterline’

Nobody’s Girl (l-r): Grace Pettis, Rebecca Loebe, Betty Soo. Contributed/Nikki Gell

The new Austin trio Nobody’s Girl grew partly from the roots of the Kerrville Folk Festival, where Betty Soo, Grace Pettis and Rebecca Loebe had been past winners of the fest’s New Folk Competition. Earlier this year, they teamed up to perform a set there together, after spending the winter writing and recording material for a debut record.

That disc, a seven-song EP titled “Waterline,” comes out Friday, Sept. 28, supplementing original tunes with fellow Austin singer-songwriter Raina Rose’s “Bluebonnets” and a cover of Blondie’s “Call Me.” Recording with renowned producer/keyboardist Michael Ramos for the new label Lucky Hound, they worked with a major-league backing crew: guitarist David Grissom, bassist Glenn Fukunaga, drummer J.J. Johnson and pedal steel player Ricky Ray Jackson.

The result isn’t as folk-oriented as you might suspect from those Kerrville connections. “Waterline” probably fits under the broad Americana umbrella, but this feels like pop music at its core, with electric instrumentation prominent in the arrangements.

The opening track “What’ll I Do” (which gets an acoustic reprise at the end of the disc) got an early release a few months ago. It exemplifies the trio’s exuberant sound built around soaring three-part harmonies. The same is true for the EP’s title track, which features a video that we’re premiering on Austin360. Here’s “Waterline”:

The band celebrates the release of the EP with a performance on Saturday, Sept. 29, at the Saxon Pub (10 p.m., $10).

It’s also worth checking out the video for their rendition of Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car,” done last winter when they were initially billing themselves as the Sirens of South Austin.

RELATED: More on recent and upcoming releases by Austin artists

Fall Out Boy pairs sonic blasts with sensational visuals at Erwin Center concert

Pete Wentz of Fall Out Boy performs at the Erwin Center on September 23, 2018. ANA RAMIREZ / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

When you buy a concert ticket in the upper deck of the Erwin Center on the far end of the arena, it’s a given that you’ll be a long way from the action. Just being in the room is good enough if you really love the band, but you’re prepared for the performers to look pretty small from way back there.

So fans of Fall Out Boy who were in those seats must have been delighted when the Chicago rockers introduced an ingenious gimmick midway through their Sunday night show. First, drummer Andy Hurley and guitarist Joe Trohman set up on a platform at the end of a long runway that extended from the stage. Then suddenly singer Patrick Stump and bassist Pete Wentz appeared on another platform even further out, all the way at the other end of the arena.

As the band launched into their 2005 hit “Dance, Dance,” those faraway fans suddenly found themselves with quite a close-up view. Then the platforms gradually rose from suspended cables. By the time the band segued into “Wilson (Expensive Mistakes)” from their new album “Mania,” Stump and Wentz’s stage had elevated all the way up to mezzanine level. Those nosebleed-seat purchases now seemed like a steal.

That was the high point (literally and figuratively) of a stage production that sometimes seemed to be the star of the show. With seven albums and a slew of hit singles across a two-decade career, Fall Out Boy has been one of America’s most prominent rock bands of the 2000s. Even so, at times their musical performance almost seemed to be the canvas upon which some incredibly creative production designers created a spectacle of pop entertainment.

RELATED: More concert reviews on Austin360

Consider the video component. Behind the band, a huge screen displayed ever-changing thematic visuals for each song. A giant squid thrashed about in footage that accompanied “The Phoenix,” followed by majestic mountain scenes for “Irresistible.” Pixar-quality animation told a story behind “Immortals,” giving way to amusing scenes of giant muppet-like animal creatures playing instruments in a make-believe ensemble called the Rockafire Explosion as the band blasted through the opening track on its new album.

Then there was the song with zillions of emojis twirling in the background. Plus those action bits from the viral video game “Fortnite” for the early fave “Grand Theft Autumn/Where Is Your Boy.” And, naturally, scenes from various Uma Thurman films when they played their song titled “Uma Thurman.” Plenty more examples could be cited — the Princess Diana historical footage when they played “Champion,” anyone? — but you get the idea.

Oh, and the pyrotechnics: Lots of showering sparks and bomb-like blasts, plus bursts of fire including one stream that shot out from the headstock of Wentz’s bass on a couple of songs. Lest we forget the two dudes dressed in giant llama-like costumes who came out to toss T-shirts into the crowd while the band was making its way back to the main stage from the platforms.

The irony is that behind the razzle-dazzle, musically Fall Out Boy remains a pretty basic, straight-ahead four-piece guitar-drums-bass rock band. Stump is a powerful and tuneful singer, a perfect delivery vehicle for Wentz’s often angst-ridden lyrics. Shirtless and heavily tattooed Hurley attracts attention behind the drum kit; Trohman is less flashy but carries a lot of the musical weight on his shoulders with his guitar leads.

Their fans are hard-core devotees. Though the Erwin Center was a bit short of full for this show, maybe 75 percent of capacity for its south-stage setup, almost all in the house stood for the entire 90-minute set, and many sang along loudly throughout the evening. Fall Out Boy hadn’t played Austin in more than three years, and their last Erwin Center appearance was more than a decade ago. For their faithful followers, clearly it was worth the wait.

RELATED: Photos from Fall Out Boy at Austin360 Amphitheater in 2015

Machine Gun Kelly performs at the Erwin Center on September 23, 2018. ANA RAMIREZ / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Two opening acts made for a longer-than-usual concert evening. In the middle slot, Machine Gun Kelly was somewhat hit-and-miss, trying hard to rev up the crowd with his energetic performance but never really getting the entire arena fully engaged. His music’s pretty different from the headliner, drawing heavily on rap music. A late-set highlight had a local connection: Kelly’s recent hit “Bad Things” cribs its catchy chorus from “Out of My Head,” a 1999 top-20 hit for Austin band Fastball. (Expect to hear it again at ACL Fest from Camila Cabello, whose supporting vocal was delivered via prerecorded track during Kelly’s performance.)

Opening act Nothing, Nowhere was different yet again, a heavily dramatic emo band from New England that has released three records since 2015. Leader Joe Mulherin charged through dark songs such as “Hopes Up” (as in, “I don’t want to get my hopes up”) and “Nevermore,” advising the crowd that “If you struggle with mental illness, keep fighting and stay positive.” Music seems to have been the right outlet for his own battle. His band may never reach mass-headliner status, but as an opener on a three-band bill, they held their own.

Joe Mulherin of Nothing, Nowhere performs at the Erwin Center on September 23, 2018. ANA RAMIREZ / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

This week’s music picks: Nick Lowe, Kali Uchis, Alejandro Escovedo, more

Monday: “Lazy Lester Forever” tribute at Antone’s. Among the many old-school greats who’ve played Austin’s home of the blues over the decades, Louisiana’s Lazy Lester was certainly one of the most beloved. Lester (born Leslie Johnson in 1933) died in August, but his spirit lives on in the musicians from here who held him dear, many of whom will take part in this heartfelt salute. Performers include Lou Ann Barton, Sue Foley, Derek O’Brien, Denny Freeman, Mike Morgan, Ted Roddy, Greg Izor, Eve Monsees, Mike Buck, Jay Moeller, Speedy Sparks and Grady Pinkerton. $12. 6:30 p.m. 305 E. Fifth St. antonesnightclub.com. — P.B.

Monday: Alejandro Escovedo y Don Antonio at Continental Club. The only thing certain about former Austinite Escovedo’s music is that he’ll always be reaching for new territory somewhere on the horizon. With “The Crossing,” released last week on Yep Roc Records, he teamed with the renowned Italian band for a concept album about two immigrants on the Texas border, drawing from his own family experience (his father immigrated from Mexico as a young child). Also appearing on the album are two Detroit proto-punk legends, the MC5’s Wayne Kramer and the Stooges’ James Williamson. Escovedo has played the Continental countless times in his four-decade career, but this one promises to be something new and different. $10. 10 p.m. 1315 S. Congress Ave. continentalclub.com. — P.B.

Tuesday-Wednesday: Nick Lowe, Jimmie Vaughan at Antone’s. Billed in full as “Nick Lowe’s Quality Rock & Roll Revue featuring Los Straitjackets,” this show teams the legendary British songwriter with the ace Nashville instrumental ensemble for a night that’s certain to deliver on its humblebrag. As a writer, performer and producer, Lowe has left marks on popular music that few have matched across a career spanning five decades. The icing on the cake is an opening set from hometown hero Vaughan, playing with his trio featuring B3 player Mike Flanigin and drummer George Rains. $35-$40. 8 p.m. antonesnightclub.com. — P.B.

Thursday: Kali Uchis at Stubb’s outdoor. The Colombian American singer-songwriter’s debut full-length, “Isolation” is the perfect summer album. It’s a dreamy mix of R&B, hip-hop and sunny tropicalia that conjures sexy pool parties, fruity cocktails and the hair-whipping exhilaration of beachside cruising in a convertible. Gabriel Garzon-Montano opens. $33-$39.95. 7 p.m. doors. 801 Red River St. stubbsaustin.com. — D.S.S.

Thursday: Hinds at North Door. This day’s music options present a “Sophie’s Choice” for lovers of ladies who rock, simplified only slightly by the fact that Liz Phair’s show at the Mohawk is sold out. But if you’re looking for something grimier than Kali Uchis’ sultry grooves, the stripped down garage rock from this Spanish girl band might be just the ticket. $16-$18. 8 p.m. 502 Brushy St. ndvenue.com. — D.S.S.

Speedy Ortiz opens a sold-out show for Liz Phair on Thursday at the Mohawk. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

ALSO PLAYING

Monday

  • Slash featuring Myles Kennedy & the Conspirators, Eric Tessmer at Stubb’s outdoor
  • Thrice at Emo’s
  • Black Heart Saints at Stubb’s indoor
  • Death Bells, Narrow Head at Barracuda
  • Michael Mordecai’s Jazz Jam live recording at Elephant Room

Tuesday

  • Nic Armstrong & the Thieves, Marfa Crush, Teddys at Hotel Vegas
  • Island, Rusty Dusty at Stubb’s indoor
  • Ephraim Owens, James McMurtry at Continental Gallery
  • Mike Stinson, Whitney Rose at Continental Club
  • Alice Spencer at Townsend
  • Durawa, John Inmon at El Mercado Backstage
  • Betty Soo at Geraldine’s

Wednesday

  • Tribal Seeds, Iya Terra at Scoot Inn
  • James McMurtry, Jon Dee Graham, William Harries Graham at Continental Club
  • Jeff Plankenhorn & Chris Gage at El Mercado Backstage
  • Sons of an Illustrious Father at Stubb’s indoor
  • The Wine Down with Blackillac at 3Ten
  • Malford Milligan, Wagoneers at Saxon Pub
  • Texas Radio Live with Paper Moon Shiners, Cowboys & Indians at Guero’s

Thursday

  • Liz Phair, Speedy Ortiz at Mohawk outdoor (sold out)
  • Watsky, Feed the Birds, Chukwudi Hodge at Scoot Inn
  • Bonerama at Antone’s
  • Stick Men at One World Theatre
  • Adult, Plack Blague, K23 at Barracuda
  • Quaker City Nighthawks, Scott H. Biram at C-Boy’s
  • Croy & the Boys, Rosie & the Ramblers, Bob Appel at White Horse
  • Bonnie Whitmore, Monte Warden & the Dangerous Few at Continental Gallery
  • Casper Rawls at Continental Club

Maybe I’m amazed at this Barton Hills Choir ‘Abbey Road’ video

It’s still two weeks before Paul McCartney arrives in town for the first of two concerts in Zilker Park as part of the Austin City Limits Music Festival, but the Barton Hills Choir is ready: They’ll be tackling the ambitious side two medley of the Beatles’ “Abbey Road” as part of their annual performances on the festival’s Austin Kiddie Limits stage.

The video above features a run through the suite of songs that many consider to be McCartney’s masterwork as an artist. The choir’s vocalists get support from teacher/ringleader Gavin Tabone plus band members Andy Harn, Don Cento and Jake Perlman.

Nakia teams up with the Barton Hills Choir at the 2016 Austin City Limits Music Festival in Zilker Park. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

The choir, featuring students from Barton Hills Elementary School, has been a hit at past fests, often tailoring its repertoire to well-known artists performing at the event. Tabone says focusing on McCartney this year was an easy call: “I’ve been playing and listening to that since I was a child, so it makes me very happy to share my love of that amazing work with my kids.”

They’ll also be working in something by David Byrne, who’s performing both weekends at the festival in addition to an Oct. 10 show at Bass Concert Hall. Set times for the two Barton Hills Choir performances at ACL Fest are 12:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, and 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13.

Related: Barton Hills Choir with Charlie Sexton at ACL Fest 2017

Willie Nelson on Stephen Colbert’s show: ‘I don’t hold any grudges against people’

It’s been a media-blitz week for Willie Nelson supporting his new album “My Way,” a collection of songs widely associated with Frank Sinatra. After a Tuesday appearance on ABC’s “The View,” he visited Stephen Colbert for “The Late Show” on CBS Wednesday night.

Before performing “Summer Wind,” Nelson invited Colbert out of his studio and onto his bus on 53rd Street in Manhattan. They made small talk about old photos and the new album (and, inevitably, marijuana), but they also touched upon the rally Nelson is playing next weekend at Auditorium Shores to support U.S. Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke.

Willie Nelson appeared on “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” on Wednesday. Suzanne Cordeiro for American-Statesman 2017

Addressing the controversy that arose in the wake of the rally announcement, Colbert asked Nelson, “Do you get shook up by people saying they’re going to boycott your music?”

Willie’s answer: “Naw, not really. You know, it’s their prerogative. I might not like their music either, you know, so I don’t hold any grudges against people.”

READ MORE: Check out all our Willie Nelson news on Austin360

Nelson also cleared up some confusion about a statement in last week’s press release announcing the rally would be “the first public concert Nelson has held for a political candidate.” Nelson mentioned he’d played shows in the past for Dennis Kucinich, Ross Perot and even country singer Tex Ritter, a Republican who lost a 1970 campaign for the U.S. Senate in Tennessee.

Past political events Nelson played, however, involved ticketed fundraisers, Nelson’s publicist Elaine Schock clarified Friday, whereas the Sept. 29 rally is a free event open to the public.

In Nelson’s appearance on “The View,” Schock reported that when he was asked about the controversy regarding the rally, his response was simply, “We’re not happy until they’re not happy.”

One interesting bit of trivia that arose from the Colbert interview segment: Willie apparently was not familiar with legendary cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Someone ought to get those two in a room together and see what happens.

Here’s the footage of his “Summer Wind” performance: